Tag Archives: God’s Almighty Power

And We’re Home (aka Going Out With a Bang!)

So, the last few days were not exactly what we had planned … but we’re home now and Emily is doing great -back to her normal, spunky self.

I’ll give a brief recap, just in case you’re lost as to what happened – perhaps because you haven’t read all the posts, have read the posts but didn’t understand them, read the posts and got completely confused with all the changing information, were taken by complete surprise because you didn’t even know she was having her port removed (sorry Gaby!), or you’re like me and you wait until you have all the information before you pay attention(!).

Thursday morning Emily and I checked in at the UC Davis Children’s Surgery Center  one last time so she could have her port removed. Now that she’s completed her treatment, and she’ll only need one lab draw a month (and possibly one IVIG transfusion a month), it’s best to take the port out to reduce the risk of an infection.

Waiting for surgery

Waiting for surgery

We passed the time visiting with all our beloved doctors and nurses while Emily colored on her sheets. We haven’t been to the surgery center since April, and we don’t expect to go back, so it was fun to see everyone and say goodbye. 

Heading to the Op Room!

Heading to the Op Room!

Dr. Abramson, the surgeon who initially placed her Broviac 2 1/2 years ago, performed the surgery to remove the port. All went well, and she was back in Recovery in just one hour.

sleeping anesthesia away

sleeping anesthesia away

As I waited for Emily to awaken, I looked around the Isolation Room and took it all in. We’ve spent many, many days here, and while I’m not sad to say goodbye, I did feel a bit nostalgic. I watched the colored lines and listened to the different beeps of her vitals being monitored, and I thought, “This is the last time she’ll be hooked up to a monitor, the last time she’ll rest in one of these beds.”  (Ha!)

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She was a bit groggy when she awoke, but she asked for potato chips, so she must not have felt too bad 😉

Her nurses gave her a special card and gift. She doesn’t look excited here, but she really loved it.

Once she had eaten and had a little drink, we said our final  tearful goodbyes and headed out. She couldn’t quite walk on her own, and my arms were full, so she got to be pushed out in one of the new carts (donated by our amazing friend, Kimberly Kaufman at Angels for Hearts).

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We headed straight to the Cancer Center for her monthly IVIG infusion. Our hope is that this was the last one. Now that she’s off treatment, it’s very likely that her body will begin to produce the missing antibodies on its own again, and she will no longer need this extra immunity boost.

All hooked up

Getting all hooked up

She’d had a peripheral line placed in her hand while she was under anesthesia, and she was very careful not to knock or jostle her hand. She just kind of held it out the whole time.

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Her transfusion took about 1 1/2 hours, and she was quiet and restful the whole time. She seemed to still be groggy from the anesthesia, so she watched a few movies and relaxed.

Just as her transfusion finished, only 5 grams of the antibodies, and the nurse was setting up her flush (saline to push the Ig all the way in and to clear the line), she started slouching down in her chair. Then all of a sudden she began shaking and crying out that she was cold. Thinking it was simply cold in the room, I sat in the chair and cuddled her in my lap. But her shaking became more and more violent -so much so that she folded herself into a fetal position and cried out that her back HURT! She kept saying, “I’m cold! I can’t do this!” And then I realized she was burning with fever. Her nurses responded instantly. They hooked her up to watch her vitals – her heart rate shot into the 170s, her blood pressure plummeted to 80/50, and her temp measured at 39.5, or 103.1 -they called in the oncologist team, and they pushed in a bolus of fluid (a fast running, large amount of saline to bring the blood pressure up).

At first everyone thought it might be an allergic reaction, but then one of her docs said, “We’ve seen this before,” and they started sepsis protocol (a typical IVIG reaction might not occur for three days). When the bolus didn’t help, they called 911. Within maybe five minutes of the initial symptoms, the paramedics were at our chair. The nurses all worked together to put in a new peripheral line so they could draw blood to culture -to grow and see if she had an infection. Then we were wheeled onto the ambulance and driven (all the way) across the street to the ER.

Once there she was given antibiotics, Tylenol to bring the fever down, and two more boluses were pushed within one hour. Thankfully this all had the effect they were hoping for. Her blood pressure came back into the normal range and her fever subsided -for the most part; we had to help the fever a bit with cold cloths, but it eventually came back down. She also had a chest xray and nasal swab. They wanted to check for any possible infection.

She was really tired and fell asleep quickly. There is no cell reception in the ER, so I sent out an SOS email, and everyone scrambled to make arrangements. Jason had to stay home with Sophia, who had a little bug (not related to Emily), so my mom and Aunt Gaby came to sit with me. She was definitely being admitted, but they hadn’t decided yet if she should go to the general Peds floor or if she needed to go to ICU. Her heart rate was still really high, and they needed it to come down.

Around 11:00 pm, she had another episode of fever and chills with elevated heart rate, but this time Tylenol fixed everything quickly, and it was decided she didn’t need the extra care from ICU and could go to the general Peds floor.

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Heading upstairs

As we waited in the ER, and then as we got settled into our room on Davis 7, some of our nurses stopped by to say hi. Of course no one wanted to see us in that condition, but it was still good to see them again.

Throughout the night Emily’s heart rate continued to drop back into the normal range again, and she didn’t have any more fevers or chills. By Friday morning she was already feeling better -tired and puny, but better. Her surgeons stopped in to check on her, then the Hem/Onc team came by to share their thoughts.

That’s when we first heard about the spot on her lungs and the possibility that it might be a fungal infection. But after 24 hours (Friday evening) of negative blood cultures, and no more symptoms, the thoughts switched back to an allergic reaction.

There really is no way to definitely know what the spot on her lungs is without invasive procedures, and those bring their own set of risks, including a greater risk of cancer development. So because the cultures remained negative (by Saturday night they were negative for 48 hours), she remained afebrile for at least 24 hours, all her vital signs returned to normal, and because the symptoms started right after receiving IVIG, which is allergenic, and she had had no signs of a fungal infection prior to Thursday (like a cough), her doctors were comfortable sending her home today. When we see Dr. Ducore in a couple weeks, we’ll discuss the possibility of doing another chest xray in a few months to check on that spot.

Emily was thrilled to head home. She wore jewelry, pajamas, and gladiator sandals -on the wrong feet -and carried her baby in matching pj’s, and walked out on her own two feet.

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Thank you all for your prayers, compassionate words, and meals! Maybe now we really are done with all of this …

We’ve (finally) Reached The End of Treatment!!!!

Hip! Hip! Hooray! (cue Lego Movie theme music) “Everything is awesome!!”

Yesterday was Emily’s Last Day of Treatment!! She received her very last dose of chemotherapy last night! We shot a little video of the moment.

We were so excited about it that we forgot to give her something very special -her Purple Heart Bead of Courage. Modeled after the honor in the armed forces, the Beads of Courage Purple Heart is awarded to children who complete their treatment, exhibiting bravery throughout. She’s been holding onto this bead for the past two weeks, anxiously waiting for this moment!

So we’re done! Two and a half years – or 863 days – of chemo. Finished.
Praise God.

2 1/2 years of Beads!

2 1/2 years of Beads!

Life

“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.”
John 10:10

God has blessed Emily with abundant life and boundless energy! He surely knew what He was doing when He knit her together in my womb! The doctors and nurses knew from the very first day that she is a fighter, and she has proved over and over again that cancer can’t keep her down.  She amazes everyone with her spunk and spirit. She truly is a miracle.

Last week she attended a Play Camp while I attended a conference, and at the end her class performed a couple of songs they learned. The video below is about 7 minutes long -if you don’t have the time to watch the whole thing, just know that she never stopped bouncing 😀

This week she is attending VBS (Vacation Bible School) with her siblings at the church I grew up in. Her teacher last night, who was one of my Sunday School teachers years ago, was overwhelmed with her energy and life! Tonight she had the honor of carrying the Bible during the Opening Ceremony, and she was So. Excited! She is truly blessing the people around her who have spent the past 2 1/2 years praying for her.

Emily, the Bible Bearer, with Pastor Berry

Emily, the Bible Bearer, with Pastor Berry

Brother William carried the American flag next to her

Brother William carried the American flag next to her

Holding it high for the pledge!

Holding it high for the pledge!

I am just so thankful for the spirit of joy that God has blessed her with. No matter what her life holds, I know He is with her, caring for her and loving her.

Last Day of IV Chemo!

Emily & Nurse Tina after her last dose of Vincristine!

Emily & Nurse Tina after her last dose of Vincristine!

Today was Emily’s last day receiving IV chemo! After her monthly clinic appointment this morning she was given her Pentamidine infusion (antibiotic), then she got her Vincristine at about 2:00 pm. And we walked out, never to return again!

Haha. Just kidding on that last part. We go back in in two weeks for her IgG transfusion, then we’ll be back monthly for clinic and lab draws. And she may still need to have IgG as well. As excited as we were this morning, the rest of the day was somewhat anticlimactic, knowing we’ll still be around for a long time to come.

She’ll continue taking her daily chemo pills for another 17 days, and she began her last round of steroids today. I tried to talk Dr. Ducore into letting us skip this round, since we’re so close. But he wasn’t going for it. So one more week of Steroid Stitch. And just two more weeks of chemo. Then we. Are. Done.

All done!

All done!

Build-A-Bear for the Kids!

It's Build-A-bear Day!!

It’s Build-A-Bear Day!!

We made it happen!! Thank you all SO, SO, SO much!! When we posted two weeks ago here , asking for help to get our Build-A-Bear idea back on its feet, you came through big time! In less than 24 hours we were 2/3 of the way to our goal, and within a week we had exceeded it!

So today, Friday Feb. 7, 2014 Jason and the Children’s Miracle Network, together with the manager and workers of our local Roseville Build-A-Bear store, are in the UC Davis Children’s Hospital Playroom putting together bears with the patients! Jason is posting pictures to his Facebook page, so I’m borrowing them and posting them here as they come in (all children shown have signed a consent).

This date was picked because February is Heart Month at the hospital, and the focus is on congenital heart disease and heart health. The B-A-B staff have set up shop in the playroom, and some of the Pediatric Heart Surgeons and Med Team have joined them to sew up the hearts. So fun!

Build-A-Bear staff

Build-A-Bear staff

Joy waiting to be spread!

Joy waiting to be spread!

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Hearts ready to go through the Heart Ceremony and be sewn into each animal.

Surgeon statioon set up!

Surgeon station set up!

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Med Students helped sew the hearts in

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I think this is good practice!

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Tucking her heart in

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So many choices!

Going through the Heart Ceremony

Going through the Heart Ceremony

Making a wish and kissing their hearts

Making a wish and kissing their hearts

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Even the kids who couldn't make it to the playroom got to participate.

Even the kids who couldn’t make it to the playroom got to participate.

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News crews showed up.

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Jason and Trisha with the Build-A-Bear team

Headed upstairs to the PICU!

Headed upstairs to the PICU!

Jason said the day went better than hoped and everyone was so pleased. He also said there were more than a few tears throughout the day, mostly from the parents who were so appreciative of the gesture. He had the chance to explain how the idea came about and how the funds were raised, and many of the parents asked him to tell all of you thank you! They were so touched.

The last thing I have to share is a video (shared with permission) of one PICU family going through the Heart Ceremony for their son, Roman, who could not do it himself.

**Thank you all SO much for helping us make this happen! I think this is my absolute favorite thing we’ve been a part of since Emily’s diagnosis two years ago.**

An article featured on the UCD website: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/welcome/features/2013-2014/02/20140214_children_bears.html

Down the Road …

Recently our local newspaper, the Sacramento Bee, published an article spotlighting the long-term side effects of cancer treatment.

Childhood Cancer Survivors

In the article, Emily’s own Nurse Practitioner from U.C. Davis, Kay Wells, discussed the risks pediatric cancer patients may face down the road.

When children are diagnosed with cancer, families fight so hard for them to make it; their lives are a gift. But the miraculous treatments that save childhood cancer patients can also, years after the fact, make them susceptible to secondary cancers and other health problems, a range of illnesses known as late effects. Now researchers are learning that those late effects can include not only the early development of the illnesses of old age but also the premature onset of frailty – the kind of physical weakness, exhaustion and low muscle mass seen more commonly in people of advanced age.

In fact, research shows that

80 percent of adults who beat cancer as kids have a chronic, perhaps life-threatening health condition by the time they reach age 45. More than half have heart abnormalities by that age. Another 65 percent have impaired lung function, and 48 percent have memory impairment.

Those are dismal words to read. But it’s not the first time we’ve heard them. When Emily was initially diagnosed, she was given a 90%-99% 5-year EFS prognosis. That dropped to 65%-80% after her CNS-2 (spinal fluid leukemia) was discovered and she didn’t respond to the Induction Phase as hoped. Relatively speaking, those are still good odds, especially when you factor into account all the prayer being poured out over Emily everyday. We are still expecting a 100% cure. But something that’s weighed on my mind ever since first hearing those statistics prompted me to ask Kay Wells about them earlier this year.

I asked, “What does 5-year EFS really mean?” EFS stands for Event-Free Survival. Tack on the “5-year” and what you’ve got is a 65%-80% chance that Emily will remain event-free (no death, relapse, or development of a secondary cancer) for 5 years. So the next question, “Well, what about after 5 years? What then?” Because I’ve looked at the statistics online, I’ve studied all the published journals and clinical trials and research I can find, and from what I can understand, the numbers don’t get better -they get worse.

Graph depicting overall survival of childhood ALL patients treated at St. Jude between 1962-2007

Graph depicting overall survival of childhood ALL patients treated at St. Jude between 1962-2007

Overall survival graph This graph shows the wonderful advancements in treatment, because you can see the vast improvement of cure-rate from 1962, when only 10% of patients lived beyond one year, to the present, when more than 90% of patients live five years. However, if you look at the top line, the thick black one, which showcases more recent patients (2000-2007), you’ll see that the overall survival rate, while better, still declines with time.

This is what was discouraging me earlier this year that I had to ask Kay about. She was very straightforward with me and said that yes, Emily will most likely face challenges down the road. However, we won’t know what they are until we get there, so there’s no use worrying now. She reminded me that we’re still trying to get Emily through treatment and to focus on that. She, and Emily’s team of doctors and nurses, are monitoring Emily closely to watch for any signs of problems -not just a relapse, but cognitive delays, growth delays, heart, lung, and liver problems, and so on. And they will continue monitoring her for the rest of her life.

Right now we have a little girl, a lovely, blessed, spirited little girl. We can snuggle her and tickle her and hug and kiss her. We can hear her laugh and sing and sass back. We are thankful for every single moment with her, and we cannot waste one second worrying about what the future may, or may not, bring. We will just keep praying. Praying she will be free of leukemia and suffer no long-term side effects. Because I know our God is bigger than statistics.

Would you pray with us for Emily’s long-term health? 

We’re putting in a Port

After extensive research, prayer, and talking with doctors/nurses and other families, we’ve decided to go with the Portecath central line instead of a Broviac. Everyone seems to agree that this is a wonderful option for Emily, and she is very excited. Presented with the two choices, she decided that she wants to be able to take baths and go swimming, and she is “going to be very brave,” when she has to get poked each time she’s accessed.She proved this last Friday when we went to the Infusion Room for her IgG transfusion. She had to have an IV put in her hand, and she did so great!! Just a little bit of crying with the needle poke, then she was fine. She didn’t even move her hand. Her nurses were so impressed, and when she was done they presented her with a reward they had purchased the night before -a sparkly, glittery My Little Pony. Emily thought the poke was definitely worth it 😉

Her surgery is scheduled for Thursday morning, and she’ll have her Port accessed for the first time when she receives her monthly spinal tap and chemos next Tuesday. Please keep her in your prayers during the next week, as she will have to be very, very brave.

Today we got to meet with her oncologist, Dr. Ducore, and I had the chance to ask him my burning question: Since the discovery of her Minimum Residual Disease (MRD) in March 2012 (which is one of the reasons she is being treated High Risk), have there been any further studies, trials, or outcomes showing that following the High Risk protocol has increased her chances of not relapsing, as hoped? He shared that unfortunately, because the importance of MRD has only just recently been discovered -within the last couple of years – the studies and trials testing how well kids with it respond to a High Risk treatment will still take another 5-10 years. Emily is ineligible for the trials, but she is one of the first patients, who presented with MRD, being treated with the more intensive High Risk protocol. So we won’t have any answers during her treatment. The good news, however, is that High Risk kids have a tendency to relapse earlier in their treatment, usually within two years of being diagnosed. If they don’t relapse in that time frame, they then fall into the Low-Standard Risk groups and have just as good of a chance of not relapsing as everyone else. Emily is 18 months into her treatment and doing well!! And, ultimately, as Auntie Plum wrote when we first learned of the MRD, we are trusting God for a 100% chance of not relapsing 🙂

Current Treatment (AKA Long-Term Maintenance)

Well, we haven’t written any new posts in a while because there really hasn’t been a lot to say! Which is good! Since her last hospital stay at the end of February, Emily has been healthy and doing well. We saw her oncologist two weeks ago, and he was very pleased with her overall health. She has FINALLY gained 1 pound, which puts her at 23.6 lbs, just shy of the 24 lbs she was when diagnosed 13 months ago. She has also grown 1.5 inches taller over the past year, so while she is still quite tiny, she is growing, praise God!

Emily and her best friend, Kayla, who is ten weeks older.

Emily and her best friend, Kayla

Many people ask whether or not Emily is still in treatment and what her future looks like. She is in the Long-Term Maintenance term of her treatment, which will last until July 2014. This is what that looks like:
* every day she takes a chemo pill (6MP) at home
* once a week she takes a bolus of a second kind of chemo (Methotrexate), 4 pills at a time at home
* once a month she takes a round of steroids (Prednisone), twice a day for five days at home
* once a month she gets a third chemo (Vincristine) through her central line at the Cancer Center
* once a month she gets an antibiotic infusion (Pentamidine) through her central line at the Cancer Center
* Her maintenance treatment is counted in three-month cycles. During the first two months of every three-month cycle, so 8 times in a year, she gets a fourth chemo (Methotrexate) into her spinal fluid via a spinal tap.
* The Home Health Nurse also comes out once a month to draw labs, and if Emily’s IgG counts are low, she goes to the Cancer Center for an IVIG transfusion.

All in all, the current treatment has been very relaxing! Gone are the daily trips to the Cancer Center, gone are the twice-a-week visits by the Home Health Nurse, and gone is the constant worry about infection. We’re still very careful, of course, especially since we now know Emily’s antibodies don’t work at all even though her ANC is high, but we don’t feel as consumed by her treatment as we have.

Emily has been handling her treatment really well. The one week of the month when she receives her spinal tap, Vincristine, antibiotic, and steroid are her worst. She is tired, weak, grumpy, sometimes has full-blown roid rages, struggles with constipation, doesn’t sleep well, and doesn’t eat much (the steroids make her hungry, but the nausea and general malaise kill her appetite). We are learning to prepare for this week by stocking tempting foods, prophylactically giving Colace (a stool softener) and nausea meds, and trying not to plan too much out of the house. It’s a good week to sit at home and read 🙂

I, personally, have struggled with my emotions and thoughts recently regarding Emily’s future -I may write about it soon -but there are many days when our family feels almost normal. The boys are all playing baseball again this year

baseball

The girls play together, brushing each other’s hair

brushing hair

and we’re able to focus on things other than cancer. It’s good.

Prayer Requests:
We have met many precious friends who are also undergoing medical treatments, and a couple of them need prayers. Amanda, 16 years old, beautiful, kind, loving, and brave, who I can’t write about without crying, is fighting recurrent progressive rhabdomyosarcoma. Her cancer came back and spread. Please, please pray for a miracle.
Olivia, who is the same age as Emily, is in kidney failure. She has a rare, genetic kidney disease that is currently in remission but is not curable. She will deal with it her whole life, and she needs prayers to have a whole life. Her twin sister also has the disease, but praise God she has not had the fight Olivia has had.
And please praise God with us for Emily’s health! We feel very lucky that she is responding to treatment. Also thank God with us for her team of doctors. They are simply amazing, and I am so grateful God chose them to care for Emily.

Delayed Intensification

Shoe Snatcher!

Last Friday marked the beginning of Emily’s Delayed Intensification stage – the final part of her Consolidation Phase and the last big push of drugs before she settles in for the two year-long Maintenance phase.

The schedule for this stage is a bit all over the place, meaning patience and flexibility are in high demand.

The first three weeks of the new stage require only one weekly visit to the infusion room for doses of Vincristine and Doxorubicin. She had a spinal tap on her first Friday visit and also began a weeklong round of steroids (a dose she will repeat after a one-week break). It has been several months since Emily was on steroids but we’ve all quickly been reacquainted with the little bear Stitch becomes with them in her system – constantly wanting to be held, always hungry but often unable to decide what she wants to eat, and sometimes very, very grumpy.

The positive to the steroid is it makes Emily a hungry hippo and her tiny frame could definitely use some fattening up!

Another positive in the first month’s schedule is that it only requires Emily to go to the hospital on Fridays, which leaves Momma Christina available to take the older four Love children to Classical Conversations each Tuesday! Emily was able to join the family on the first day of school last week – it was both her and Christina’s first time back at CC since before Emily was diagnosed! Homeschooling has been a challenge since Emily’s diagnosis, but with the help of friends and family, and four very bright and patient children, it has continued to be possible.

Emily & Cousin Ezra have school together!

October 2nd should begin the second month of the Delayed Intensification stage, so long as Emily’s blood counts and ANC remain good. The second month begins with two weeks of near-daily trips to the infusion room for 8 doses of Ara-C, 2 spinal taps, an oral medication, and the introduction of a new chemotherapy drug. Emily will finish out the month with 2 doses of Vincristine, one each week, and then she will be done with Consolidation!

The Maintenance phase which follows will include intravenous and intrathecal therapy approximately every 4 to 8 weeks, based on Emily’s level of risk, as well as occasional rounds of the steroid. This should go on for two years – taking Emily’s treatment into the fall of 2014. It seems such a long way away, but the goal is a 100% cure and we can certainly wait and pray another two years for that!

Emily has had some fun adventures, happy family outings, and good rest over the past few weeks. She has even begun regrowing her hair (though she may lose it again with the current treatment)! While the side effects of her new round of chemotherapy have already begun to settle in, it all somehow seems more manageable with an ending point a little closer on the horizon.

Continued prayers are needed for Emily as she manages the discomfort and pain caused by her drugs and also for Christina and Jason as they balance work, school, and caring for Emily. Sometimes a little family time…and couple time…is the most important thing in the world! 

Jason & his little girl

Join us in Praising the Lord for Jason recently being asked to join the Board of the local Children’s Miracle Network! Jason has been speaking at local fundraising events, sharing his and Emily’s story, and helping support the U.C. Davis Children’s Hospital that provides her care. The Children’s Miracle Network is blessed to have gained Jason’s compassionate spirit and personal experience as they continue to help children around the country. 

ooOoo

In other news, it is time for your local blogger (aka Elisabeth/Auntie Plum) to say farewell. The Lord has blessed me with an opportunity to serve overseas as a Peace Corps Volunteer and I will be saying goodbye to my family and friends this coming Monday, September 10th. I will be moving to Rwanda, where I will serve for 2 years, 3 months as an English Teacher in a rural village.

God has put the passion to serve on my heart and I know that this is all in His plans. Indeed, the timing has been purely Christ. Had I received my Invitation a few months ago, after Emily was first diagnosed, I am certain I wouldn’t have been able to go. While Emily still has a battle ahead, I know that she is in the best hands and I can leave with a heart of joy, knowing she is loved and cherished.

As I will likely be receiving family news days (if not weeks) delayed, I am passing the baton to other family members to continue to keep this blog updated and all of Emily’s supporters in the know! Over the coming months, Aunt Gaby, Aunt Danielle, Grammie (Genie), and Momma Christina will be sharing the blogging duties. Give them love, as they put their hearts to ink, and continue to share with you Emily’s journey.

Grammie, Aunt Gaby, Aunt Danielle, Aunt Elisabeth, Momma Christina, Aunt Jennifer at Auntie Plum’s Going Away party

Goodbye Methotrexate!

Color with me!

Emily came home from her fourth and final round of high-dose Methotrexate today. Once again, she cleared the drug from her system in record time! The round of chemotherapy we were all the most worried about has turned out to be a bit of a breather.

In the midst of this 8-week interim Maintenance phase, we found out that Emily’s spinal fluid is clear of Leukemia cells and that she’s just a couple months away from her final [lengthy] treatment phase…and that ultimate goal: her treatment finish line!

In two weeks, Emily will begin her delayed intensification Maintenance phase – a two month treatment phase that will include three spinal taps and several weeks with nearly daily chemotherapy infusions. It will be a final intense push to eradicate the cancer from her blood before she sets in for two years of Maintenance to make sure the Leukemia never comes back.

Playing with her new Beads of Courage

Thank you for all of your prayers over these past two months. We have truly seen God answer those prayers by allowing the Methotrexate to eliminate cancer cells without causing Emily undue pain. After being so worried about the Methotrexate, we are thrilled to finally have it behind us. The Lord has truly walked Emily through this phase and we have no doubt He will continue to carry her through the last two phases of her treatment.